Tackle eyesight nerves with ‘I Can See Just Fine’

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ICanSeeJustFine eyesightI CAN SEE JUST FINE,” by Eric Barclay, Abrams Appleseed, Aug. 6, 2013, hardcover, $14.95 (ages 4-6)

As someone who started wearing glasses in the first grade, I can understand the struggles of poor eyesight and the reluctance to become another “four-eyes.” “I Can See Just Fine” tackles the nerves associated with getting a first pair of glasses and take the fear out of going to the optometrist.

And while this book is educational, it’s a lot of fun, too. Eric Barclay has infused a bit of humor throughout as Paige, the reluctant star of this book, declares she doesn’t need spectacles. Eric’s illustrations are bright and slightly stylized, giving the overall look unique but recognizable feel.

Paige is just like every other kid. She goes to school. She practices her violin. She plays outside. The only problem is, she cannot quite see the chalkboard, her sheet music, or anything else! Despite Paige’s repeated refrain of “I can see just fine,” the illustrations portray a different story. Paige’s parents decide it’s time for her to visit the eye doctor, despite her protests. But Paige’s stubbornness quickly dissolves as she braves an eye checkup, enjoys a playful frame selection, and, most importantly, ends up with perfect eyesight!*

classroom noresize eyesight

*Synopsis provided by Abrams Appleseed

Editor’s note: The above post differs from Cracking the Cover’s regular review format. Learn more.

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About Author

Jessica Harrison is the main reviewer behind Cracking the Cover. Prior to creating Cracking the Cover, Jessica worked as the in-house book critic for the Deseret News, a daily newspaper in Salt Lake City. Jessica also worked as a copy editor and general features writer for the paper. Following that, Jessica spent two years with an international company as a social media specialist. She is currently a freelance writer/editor. She is passionate about reading and giving people the tools to make informed decisions in their own book choices.

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